Next Generation Diagnostic Tool May Transform Patient Outcomes





During the 12th Annual Scientific Sessions  of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR), the world’s major international society for cardiovascular imaging, the role of perfusion imaging in clinical decision making will be refined.

During the 12th Annual Scientific Sessions  of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR), the world’s major international society for cardiovascular imaging, the role of perfusion imaging in clinical decision making will be refined.

This technique allows measuring blood flow to the heart muscle with an unprecedented spatial resolution and without any ionizing radiation. Multicenter data has already suggested a superiority of this technique in comparison to methods now used on a routine basis. New data presented during the meeting further expands its role, suggesting that new techniques with faster imaging will further improve spatial resolution and enhance diagnostic accuracy.

Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, for example, may also be used in patients after bypass surgery. This is due to its ability to discriminate areas with scar from complex flow patterns as found after surgery. Similarly, the high spatial resolution allows detecting remaining areas of reduced blood flow after therapy. These new areas for using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging expand the indications of this relatively young technique and lead to a reconsideration of the application of magnetic resonance imaging mainly as a second line technique.

“Given the amount of information we get from a single examination, ranging from the size and function of the heart, through scar tissue after myocardial infarction, to an excellent visualization of myocardial blood flow,” said Christoph Klein, MD from the German Heart Institute Berlin. “We should use magnetic resonance imaging as the premier imaging technique in a large group of patients.”

Further research is guided towards quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow to allow doctors not only to discriminate between normal and abnormal blood flow, but also to measure the effect of therapy and to individually guide patient management.

Founded in 1994, SCMR is a professional association whose vision is to be the recognized representative and advocate for physicians, scientists and technologists who work in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance. SCMR endeavors to be the principal international, independent organization committed to the further development of cardiovascular magnetic resonance through education, quality control, research, and training.

Contact:
Deborah Berkowitz, SCMR
(856) 423-7222; dberkowitz@talley.com
Eike Nagel, MD, PhD
eike.nagel@kcl.ac.uk