Siemens ties up with National Jewish Medical and Research

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With a shared vision of a more personalized medicine, Siemens Healthcare and National Jewish Medical and Research Center, based at Denver in US have formed a strategic alliance to improve and develop novel imaging and diagnostic technologies using genomics, proteomics, and integrated research and clinical care.

With a shared vision of a more personalized medicine, Siemens Healthcare and National Jewish Medical and Research Center, based at Denver in US have formed a strategic alliance to improve and develop novel imaging and diagnostic technologies using genomics, proteomics, and integrated research and clinical care.
 
As part of the initiative, National Jewish will integrate Siemens technology throughout the institution to help diagnose respiratory, cardiac and rheumatologic diseases. Especially important will be the Institute for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, where much of the patient care and collaborative research planned for this alliance will be conducted.
 
"We are excited about our collaboration with National Jewish and look forward to supporting the organization with new clinical pathways and workflows for improved quality and patient care. Integrating new concepts for early detection, including state-of-the-art imaging and information technologies, as well as molecular methods, will help support our shared vision of personalized health care," said Mr Heinrich Kolem, CEO of Siemens Medical Solutions USA.
 
"Together we will be leaders in bringing forward the concept of advanced diagnostics, which merges imaging and the clinical reference laboratories," said Dr Michael Salem, president and CEO of National Jewish.
 
National Jewish is a non-profit institution renowned worldwide as a leader in the research and treatment of respiratory, immune, and related disorders. Its alliance with Siemens will help accelerate a new era in medicine, moving beyond the current reactive trial-and-error model of practicing medicine to a proactive model of personalized, total healthcare. This will be achieved by integrating the facility's research and clinical efforts at the point of the patient, so that each patient can take advantage of the latest technological innovations.
 
The Institute for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, scheduled to open this spring, will house two Siemens computed tomography (CT) systems and one positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) system, replacing the hospital's CT scanner currently in place. Key to the long-term development of this vision is an integrated radiology information system (RIS) and picture archive communication system (PACS) solution that uses the same syngo architecture as the imaging modalities leading to data reconciliation and consistency.